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This Is Something That Can Save Unborn Babies, And It's So Easy To Find

AUGUST 16, 2017  —  By Sarah Jewel  
Sarah Jewel

Sarah Jewel

Animal and pizza lover with an Internet addiction. Nerd to the max. Currently residing in the land of beautiful winters.

Pregnant women get all kinds of advice from doctors, friends, family, and the internet.

A lot of this advice can be conflicting and confusing, which is why for the most part being vigilant and listening to medical professionals is the way to go. New research into miscarriage and birth defects is showing that one major vitamin may help prevent some of these occurrences, which affect up to 20 percent of pregnancies worldwide.

A recent study suggests that women may experience a shortage of vitamin B3 in the early stages of pregnancy.

B3, also known as niacin, is needed to create an essential protein in the body. Environmental factors that lower B3 can lead to increased risk of miscarriage.

Vitamin B3 is found in leafy greens and meat, and a healthy amount is recommended for everyone, regardless of pregnancy status.

The research, which was done on mice, led to a huge decline in miscarriages among mice that had taken B3 supplements. Doctors emphasize that this study was done on mice, not humans, and that more research is needed.

Taking too much of B3, or any vitamin, can be dangerous. Researchers recommend talking to your doctor and consuming the regular daily value of vitamin B3 unless future studies show different results.

Still, doctors remain hopeful that studies like these will provide pregnant women with answers and solutions someday.

(via CNN)

We should all probably add more leafy greens into our regular diets. If it happens to help babies, that's even better. I'm so glad there are people out there working on studies like these to help expecting moms.

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