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A Creationist Decided To Sue The Grand Canyon Because Everything Is Insane Now

MAY 29, 2017  —  By Sarah Gzemski  
Sarah Gzemski

Sarah Gzemski

Animal and pizza lover with an Internet addiction. Nerd to the max. Currently residing in Arizona, the land of beautiful winters.

I think we can all agree that the Grand Canyon is a national treasure.

I'll admit, the first time I went to the Grand Canyon, I was skeptical. I'd heard my whole life how amazing it was and I figured that nothing could live up to my expectations. I am here to tell you that I was 100 percent wrong and that it is every bit as grand as they say.

At 1.84 billion years old, the Grand Canyon is a rich source of scientific study, especially for geologists. The layers of strata are clearly visible in the canyon, which was carved out by a river over literal billions of years. One scientist who was denied the ability to gather rock samples has decided he's had enough, so he's suing the Grand Canyon and its officials.

Dr. Andrew Snelling, a creationist scientist (as crazy as those two words are together) applied to gather rock samples at the Grand Canyon.

While it may be tempting for some to say that Snelling gathering samples is harmless, it's important to know that all proposals that involve chipping away at a national landmark are vetted thoroughly.

Three leading geologists studied Snelling's proposal and came to the conclusion that it was not scientifically sound. Whether or not he was allowed to gather samples was beside the point because his research was faulty to begin with.

It's also important to know that geologists working at the canyon don't just gather a few rocks at the bottom. The process can be incredibly destructive, which is why it is limited to, I don't know, actual science.

Snelling has decided to sue the Grand Canyon's caretakers, claiming discrimination against him.

Despite the fact that he has zero scientific standing whatsoever, he still thinks he should be allowed to do whatever he wants to destroy what many people (scientifically-minded or not) consider to be one of God's most amazing creations! Seems normal to me.

(via IFL Science)

What do you think? Should Snelling be able to conduct his study anyway? Let us know in the comments and share this with the people you know to get their perspectives.

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