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This Looks Like Driftwood At First, But The Story Behind It Is So Cool

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017  —  By Corinne Sanders

In 1919, a ship called the William H. Sumner ran aground off Topsail Inlet in North Carolina, with the wreckage eventually disappearing over the years.

The three-masted schooner had been sailing from Puerto Rico back to its home port in New York City when it sank on September 7. The captain, 20-something Robert E. Cochrane, was found dead afterward. Later on, three crewmen confessed that the first mate had shot him.

“The story goes that the young captain on his first voyage in command had sailed too close to the shore while the currents and winds had died preventing him from sailing back offshore again," according to TopSailIslandblog.com. "The speculation is that the crew had asked the captain to detour to pick up supplies and the captain, wishing to head northward to port, would not. The crew then allegedly mutinied.”

Now, nearly a century later, the remains of the Sumner have reemerged on Surf City Beach with the help of storm winds from Hurricane Jose.

At first, beach goers thought it just logs or driftwood. Then they noticed the pieces were interconnected.

According to The Charlotte Observer, the section of the ship's ceiling and deck is rarely uncovered from the layers of sand. Locals say that you might be able to see it once a year during a low tide.

Learn more about this amazing piece of history below.

(via Daily Mail and The Charlotte Observer)

While it's illegal to move or disturb the pieces, as North Carolina claims all abandoned shipwrecks in the water, officials are encouraging anyone in the area to check it out before it vanishes again. I wish I could be there to see it!

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