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This Egg Is So Rare That When It Was Crushed, An Entire Team Leapt Into Action. You'll See Why.

By Emma Reyes  
MARCH 10, 2014

Have you ever heard of a Kakapo?

I wouldn't be surprised if you haven't. These incredibly rare parrots live in New Zealand. They are large, scholarly-looking birds that you'd just want to cuddle (if they weren't a wild animal with really, really sharp claws). Their numbers are rapidly dwindling, they are officially a "critically endangered" species. Researchers can count (and list by name) the number of Kakapos left on earth. That's why when one chick was in danger, an entire group of rescuers leapt into action.

This little gentleman is a Kakapo, also known as the owl parrot.

This little gentleman is a Kakapo, also known as the owl parrot.

Kakapos are large, flightless, nocturnal, ground dwelling parrots. And they are on the brink of extinction. There are approximately only 125 individuals alive today.

Kakapos are large, flightless, nocturnal, ground dwelling parrots. And they are on the brink of extinction. There are approximately only 125 individuals alive today.

So when Lisa, the momma bird, accidentally crushed her egg it was vital for her keepers to attempt to save it.

So when Lisa, the momma bird, accidentally crushed her egg it was vital for her keepers to attempt to save it.

The keepers used a gentle adhesive to hold the egg together, hoping that the membrane inside and the baby Kakapo weren't damaged.

The keepers used a gentle adhesive to hold the egg together, hoping that the membrane inside and the baby Kakapo weren't damaged.

All they could do was pray and wait.

All they could do was pray and wait.

Then, a miracle! The little Kakapo broke through the shell on February 28th, 2014.

Then, a miracle! The little Kakapo broke through the shell on February 28th, 2014.

This chick is the first Kakapo hatched in 2014.

This chick is the first Kakapo hatched in 2014.

Smile for the camera!

Smile for the camera!

The little chick is growing and staying strong. Hopefully, this is just one chick on the road to helping the Kakapo recover.

The little chick is growing and staying strong. Hopefully, this is just one chick on the road to helping the Kakapo recover.

Kakapos are unique, wonderful birds of New Zealand. Kakapo Recovery is an organization dedicated to saving the critically endangered animal. They work closely with the Kakapo population of Codfish Island in New Zealand to help boost their numbers.

This was dramatically illustrated by the phenomenal breeding event of 2002, when 24 chicks were added to the kakapo population in a matter of months and again in 2009 when 33 chicks hatched. Two kakapo staff work on Whenua Hou, and have to put up with an isolated location and the wild weather of New Zealand’s deep south. It has no roads and is reached by light plane or helicopter.

The island is a specially-protected nature reserve, and no unauthorised landing is permitted.

If you'd like to help the Kakapo, please visit the Kapapo Recovery's website and donate to their cause.

Source: Kakapo Recovery Facebook

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