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They Look Like Epic Photographs Already But Watch What Happens When He Pans Out

APRIL 13, 2017  —  By Sarah Jewel  
Sarah Jewel

Sarah Jewel

Animal and pizza lover with an Internet addiction. Nerd to the max. Currently residing in the land of beautiful winters.

Photographers have an incredible gift for capturing life in images we can respond to emotionally.

While it's amazing to simply look at the photos, sometimes the process of getting the image can be just as fascinating. That's why publications like National Geographic often include the photographer's own words to describe how they got the perfect shot.

One man, however, is proving that you don't have to go far to get an amazing photo. In fact, he doesn't even need to leave the house.

This photo by Vatsal Kataria shows an incredible ocean landscape... or does it?

In reality, this island paradise is actually a miniature scene built from plaster in Kataria's workshop.

Kataria says that while most people think they need expensive props to be a good photographer, he's been able to accomplish so much while using very little.

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Most of his creations are made from plaster and paint, though sometimes he will also use polystyrene sheets, baking powder, and homemade foliage.

Kataria stresses that it's not important to spend a lot of money to get a good picture. It's all about being resourceful.

He uses Photoshop to enhance the images and create the impression of different types of weather.

From beginning to end, each one of these miniature projects can take between three and 15 days.

Kataria says the possibilities for miniatures are "endless" and encourages other photographers to take images their own way.

(via BoredPanda)

For more of his amazing work, follow Vatsal Kataria on Instagram. What do you think he should build next? Let us know in the comments, and be sure to share this with all the artsy people you know.

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