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Many Say Out-Of-Body Experiences Are A Hoax, But Did Science Prove Them Wrong?

AUGUST 5, 2017  —  By Corinne Sanders

Have you ever woken up and felt as if you were floating outside of your own body?

Many who've reported having these types of experiences believe they're caused by spiritual or even paranormal forces, while others think they're completely faked. But according to a new study by the Aix-Marseille Université in France, out-of-body experiences (OBE) are linked to a perfectly explainable physical issue.

Neuroscientist Christophe Lopez and other researchers compared two sets of 210 patients matched by the same ages and genders. One set had a history of dizziness, while the other did not.

About 14 percent of those who did suffer from dizziness reported having out-of-body experiences. As one stated, it felt "like I'm outside of myself. I feel like I'm not in myself.” Only five percent of those who didn't experience dizziness reported OBEs.

The study also found that most of those who had dizziness and a history of OBE had experienced OBEs only after they started having dizziness for the first time. Many of those subjects had also been diagnosed with depression, anxiety, depersonalization, or migraines.

According to the researchers, "OBE in patients with dizziness were mainly related to peripheral vestibular disorders," or inner ear issues that affect the ability to process sensory information and control balance and eye movements. This type of damage to the ears can result in dizziness, vertigo, floating sensations, and lightheadedness.

(via IFL Science)

It's important to mention that the researchers found a correlated relationship between dizziness and OBE rather than a causal relationship, but the correlation is definitely worth looking into.

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