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You Don't Think Too Much About This... Until You See These Pictures. Then It Hits You Hard.

By Bryan Hartwell  
FEBRUARY 24, 2014

This series of photographs of primates living in captivity named 'Behind Glass' is by Atlanta-based photographer Anne Berry. From South Africa to Belgium she traveled the world to capture photos of apes and monkeys living in small zoos, in hopes of truly reflecting and capturing life on the other side of the glass/barrier.

Most of the captive primates in Anne's photographs look quite sad, but she insists her work is not to advocate against zoos. "I think zoos are doing a better and better job of keeping animals and replicating habitats that don't exist in the wild anymore," Berry said. "It's not the best that you'd like, but it's keeping species alive."

The name 'Behind Glass' refers both to the glass or boundaries of an enclosure and to the glass of the camera lens.

The somber mood of the photographs isn't accidental either, she shoots them in black and white and uses a wide aperture on her 80mm lens. She does this as the black and white images feel both aged and emotional, each photo clearly showing the solitude of the animal. "I think it makes people have more empathy for them and stop and look at the picture. If they feel sadness and nostalgia, they might think about what's happening and the challenges the animals face in the wild due to the increasing loss of their natural habitat," she said.

You can Like Anne Berry on Facebook or Visit Her Web Site.

Source: Anne Berry  Via LensCulture

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