This Woman Was Beautiful And Had A Great Life, But Depression Doesn't Discriminate

OCTOBER 14, 2016  —  By Matthew Derrick  
Matthew Derrick

Matthew Derrick

Writer and sassy ginger currently residing in central Pennsylvania. Matt spends most of his free time online shopping for clothing that he doesn't need, perfecting the art of eye-rolling, and indulging in all forms of pop culture.

There's more to people than what they show on the outside.

Someone could have the perfect life full of love, money, and other material possessions, but those mean absolutely nothing if they feel empty inside. Depression can make you feel like you're alone in a crowded room and often leads to more serious conditions such as self-harming or even suicide. Depression doesn't discriminate. People of all ages, races, and religions can all experience this hardship, and not everyone knows where to turn for help. Even more are afraid to ask.

In 2015, only 41 percent of adults in the U.S. struggling with mental illness sought treatment. Statistics show that 80 percent of those receiving treatment for depression, however, show signs of improvements in just four to six weeks.

This is a photo of a woman named Michelle. She was stunning and had the world at her fingertips.

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Michelle had a budding career as a makeup artist and stylist in the San Francisco Bay area.

She was always well-liked and had tons of friends.

She was the life of the party and knew how to have fun without crossing the line.

But despite everything she had going for her, Michelle lost her battle with chronic depression. Five years ago, she took her own life by jumping from a window located on the eighth floor of this building.

Read More: He Was Too Depressed To Get Out Of Bed, Until An Unlikely Friend Changed His Life

Her family wants others struggling with this heartbreaking illness to know that they'll always be missed, no matter how lonely they might feel. The most important takeaway here is to seek help when you need it.

If you or someone you know is experiencing depression that is leading to suicidal thoughts, I can't urge you enough to call the suicide hotline at 1-800-273-8255.

(via National Network of Depression Centers)


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