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This Desert In Australia Is Normally Arid, But A Recent Downpour Transformed It

DECEMBER 30, 2016  —  By Matthew Derrick  
Matthew Derrick

Matthew Derrick

Writer and sassy ginger currently residing in central Pennsylvania. Matt spends most of his free time online shopping for clothing that he doesn't need, perfecting the art of eye-rolling, and indulging in all forms of pop culture.

Towering in at over 1,100 feet tall, the Ayers Rocks of Uluru make up a natural landmark that has tourists flocking from all across the globe to take in the breathtaking views.

Known for its illustrious red sandstone color, Uluru is situated in the middle of the desert in central Australia and is considered to be sacred according to the aboriginal inhabitants of the surrounding land. The towering landmark is the center of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park.

This formation is believed to be over 600 million years old, and despite containing multiple watering holes and natural springs, the area around Uluru does not receive much rainfall throughout the year. But in a year when just about anything is possible, the people of central Australia were able to take in a miraculous sight that occurs only once every 50 years.

It might be hard to believe but over 600 million years ago, the sandstone of Uluru was buried under the sea. Today the formation towers over 1,100 feet above sea level.

Read More: He Poured A Tablespoon Of Olive Oil Into A Lake To Calm The Waves In Just Minutes

Located in the heart of the Australian desert, Uluru isn't known for receiving large amounts of rainfall.

But tourists in the area received an unexpected Christmas Eve surprise as torrential downpours rocked the area.

The Bureau of Meteorology noted that downpours such as this one occur only once every 50 years in the region.

Heavy rain waters formed enormous waterfalls along the mountainsides.

A few tourists taking in the sights at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park were able to capture the extreme weather event on video.

It's hard to believe that just days before, these rushing rapids didn't even exist.

The park was forced to close Monday morning following severe flash flooding.

Check out more incredible footage in the video below!

video-player-present

Thankfully, there are no reports of death or injury caused by the event.

Read More: It Looks Like They Can't Possibly Swim In This Puddle, But They Dive Right In

(via Mashable)

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